Rob’s Blog: What’s Not to Like?

Possible stocking stuffer for a British car person.
Possible stocking stuffer for a British car person.

After receiving several calls over the years asking for help getting rid of old MGBs, I’ve come to the indisputable conclusion MGBs are the old wooden boats of the automobile world. There are lots of them, don’t seem to be worth much in good condition and almost nothing in poor condition.

This morning I received the latest call from an elderly owner asking for, you guessed it, help getting rid of his old MGB. Like so many, it has been sitting outside in the weather, waiting patiently to be restored to its original condition. The expression, “Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder” is never more tested than when an owner gazes lovingly at his rusty pile of sheet metal and sees only shiny curves of what it looked like driving off the showroom floor so many years before.

My rusty hulk of sheet metal was my original owner, 1971 VW bus, so I speak with some authority on the subject. Valuable for parts only and not too many of them went unscathed by the ravages of the Hawaiian weather. The latest offering can be seen in the Craigslist ad included below.

After spending time talking to the owner, Chester, I was almost seeing his car through the same rose colored glasses he was. Then I looked it up on Craigslist and was jolted back to a rusty reality. Let’s just say it is a good deal for the dedicated car enthusiast with lots of time on their hands. You be the judge.

It is a complete car with lots of good, spare parts included, and for that reason alone worth considering. Also included is a 1974 Austin Marina engine, a two speed automatic transmission, and even a custom made tow bar. What’s not to like?

Call Chester at either of his two numbers and get the full story. His cell number is 808-421-7765 and his (more preferred) home number is 808-737-3930

See all of you at the Christmas lunch this Sunday the 17th.

Aloha,
Rob
808-429-6602

Link to Chester’s Craigslist ad:
https://honolulu.craigslist.org/oah/cto/d/1978-mg-mgb-parts-car-mostly/6413076600.html

Rob’s Blog: Everyone Loves a Parade

Photo of the Kailua July 4th Parade

Here is a chance to abuse your car to it’s thermal limits. Nothing like a parade on a nice, hot, July afternoon to get the fluids flowing all over the radiator and out onto the ground.

On the brighter side, you get to meet lots of nice people along the parade route. Maybe some of them will help push your car off to a side street when it overheats.

Do I like parades? “Yes”. Do I think sixty year old, coolant challenged, British cars should be subjected to parades, “No.”

In case you feel differently than I do, and in fairness to everyone who feels differently, I have forwarded the following email from Fred Weisberger (Antique Automobile Club of America) and the Kailua 4th of July parade organizers to all of you. If you decide to participate, have a great time and do the club right. We’ll reserve a tech session for you sometime in the near future.

Aloha, Rob
808-429-6602


Hi Car Folk,

The Exchange Club of Downtown Honolulu (similar to Rotary) is participating in the Kailua 4th of July Parade–the oldest and largest such parade in Hawaii!

The Exchange Club will be distributing 2,500 small American flags to people along the parade route. The Exchange Club is looking for six or seven antique cars to carry older members and the boxes of flags. I will be participating with one of my antique cars, so we are still looking for another six or so cars.

We will first meet at my house and then drive to the staging location as a group. This a fun parade with literally thousands of friendly spectators lining the 1 1/2 mile parade route–and they love our antique cars!

The unit is near the front of the parade, so it should move quickly and be a lot of fun for all. More information to follow. If you are interested in participating the 2017 Kailua 4th of July Parade, please contact me.

Fred Weisberger
Phone: (h) 254-0392 / (c) 354-4644

Rob’s Blog: More than 70 years of British Technology

By every measure, this year’s All British Car Day was the biggest, the best, and most organized of any previous year. Brett, Dave, and Dr. Rob culled through email lists from previous shows and made sure everyone who had even thought of a British car, got word of the event. The effort paid off with the largest attendance ever. On display was British technology spanning over seven decades of automotive design and styling.

Running parking lot defense for the club were a couple of early risers who kept our reserved parking area clear of the equally early morning runners who mistakenly think the “NO PARKING” signs are for their event, rather than ours. Their effort paid off big time.

When the Kapiolani Park show ended, the event moved to the Morgan Estate for the presentation of awards, a catered lunch by Fat Boy’s, and raffle. And speaking of the raffle, the club picked up a new sponsor this year. Anna Pang of Mont Blanc, in the Ala Moana Shopping Center, donated a couple of really nice items to the raffle pot.

Jerry Bacon, 2107 Anastasia Cup Honoree

Jerry Bacon went home with the Anastasia Cup for 2017. Talk about slipping through the cracks, Jerry has been a club member for decades, and has run down more electrical issues than anyone can count, and yet, he was never publicly recognized for his service, and support. We all knew he was there, but not until now did he finally get his official “thanks” from all of us. Way to go Jerry!

Eberhard Kintscher, People’s Choice Winner 1960 Triumph TR3A.

To say voting for the People’s Choice Award was close would be an understatement. Good thing there was one winner, because there was a four way tie for second. Eberhard Kintscher, aka Chef Hardy, came out in front by one vote. His Beautiful 1960 TR3A is worth every vote and a deserved winner of this coveted award.

A huge cyber applause should also be sent out to everyone who helped pull this event together, and especially the guys who got up early and started it off so smoothly this year. Also, a big thanks to the Morgan family for hosting the lunch at their beautiful, historic home. It was the final touch to making this year’s event the best ever.

See more photos of the All British Car Day.

Rob’s Blog: Celebrating 25 Years of British Cars

At the All British Car Day in 2016
Cars and Coffee Kapahulu May 24, 2015

If you have attended an All British Car Day in the past, either as an owner or a spectator, you know it is the biggest British car event in Hawaii. This year will be no exception. On Sunday, May 28th, Memorial Day weekend, British cars of all kinds will gather at Kapiolani Park and invite the public to have a look.

If you plan on entering your car in this great event, here is how the day will play out.

First, you are encouraged to send in the registration form (see below) and sign up for either the basic $10, or deluxe $25, entry.

On the morning of the event, arrive at the middle parking level of the Ala Moana Shopping Center, the Diamond Head end, near Macy’s, no later than 8:30 a.m. The easiest way to get there is to take the parking ramp off of Atkinson Drive (next to the Ala Moana Hotel) and go to the second level. At 8:45 we will leave the parking lot and caravan our way through Waikiki to the venue at Kapiolani Park.

Upon arriving at the park, you will be directed to the area designated for your make of car. After parking, proceed to the registration desk to pick up your packet.

The show is free to the public and will continue until noon. At that time everyone with a deluxe registration is invited to caravan to the Morgan Estate in Manoa for a catered lunch, the gift raffle, presentation of awards and more car talk. One of the “perks” of the deluxe registration is a $5 voucher redeemable towards your lunch. The actual cost of the catered lunch is still to be determined, but you can bet it will be delicious, and well worth the cost. Especially when the club is paying you back five dollars.

It’s always fun to see a few “new” cars that have been hidden away suddenly appear out of nowhere that day. Remember, your car doesn’t have to be a show car, or even running. It just has to be British.

This would be the perfect place to sell your classic, or maybe buy another one. If you have any question about this event, don’t hesitate calling me.

The suggested deadline for registering is two weeks from today, Wednesday, May 24th, so don’t put it off.

Aloha, Rob
808-429-6602

2017 All British Car Day registration form

Rob’s Blog: Need a Lift?

Engine hoist photo

If you’re contemplating the removal of your car’s engine, I’m about to become your new best friend.

For years I have stored a huge engine hoist in my garage, anticipating the day I’d have to remove the monster engine from my Jaguar. I used it once to install the current engine at least twenty years ago, and a few other times around the house for miscellaneous “hoisting” jobs.

If you need to pull the concrete base of a basketball pole from the ground, this will do the job without breaking a sweat. If you need to uproot a tree, you won’t even need a pick and shovel.

This hoist is not one of the light weight models you see on sale at NAPA, or O’Reilly’s. This monster is capable of not only lifting large engines, but entire cars off the ground. The upper range is rated at 4000 pounds (2 tons) That’s five Jaguar engines, or a half dozen Bug Eye Sprite’s, at the same time. That’s the good news. The bad news is that with such a massive lifting ability, it is very heavy, and not something you toss into the trunk of your Honda. It does have wheels and the legs are removable for easy storage.

I know as soon as I get rid of it, I’ll probably need it to remove the Jag’s engine. Because Murphy’s Law.

Here is my offer…

So, does anyone want this monster to use for as long as they want, until I need to borrow it back? Seems dumb to hold on to it while someone else in the club might need it.

I know what you’re thinking… “That bum just wants someone else to store his hoist.” Well, sort of.

Feel free to loan it to someone else after you’re done. We can pass it around the club like an unwanted raffle ticket. Eventually someone will need it. A real win-win situation.

In the folded configuration, it is 56″ high and the width between the wheels is 38”. The pump handle is missing, but anything that fits into the opening will work.

If you’re interested in this once in a lifetime offer…don’t be shy. Give me a call and we can go from there. Remember, anything from pulling stumps to lifting the corner of your house is possible with this baby.

Aloha, Rob
808-429-6602

Rob’s Blog: British Car Club of Hawaii Polo Shirt

Our club secretary Dave Luengen is taking orders for anyone interested in purchasing an official British Car Club of Hawaii polo shirts.

He has constructed a chart showing available sizes and colors. All shirts come with the club logo.

I know from having bought my own that these are well made and will last for a long time. I also know from experience that white shirts have a tendency to “suck” dirt and grease from the surroundings and are especially difficult to keep clean. But that’s just me.

These will make a great gift for birthdays, Father’s Day (June 18th) or just because you like or need a nice shirt.

Call Dave and order a couple. Have a great week.

Aloha, Rob
808-429-6602

Here are the size and color options for the official British Car Club Hawaii polo shirt:

This logo is embroidered on the left front of the shirt.

The colors are: orange, light blue, lime green, kelly green, gold, dark green, mint, white, pale yellow, black, burgundy, navy, charcoal, royal blue, purple, red, bright blue and teal.

$42 for sizes small, medium, large, extra large
+$2.00 2XL
+$3.00 3XL
+$3.00 4XL
+$4.00 5XL
+$4.00 6XL

If you are interested in one, please let Dave know by calling him at 808-674-1418 by April 14, 2017.

Rob’s Blog: A Public Service Announcement

Here’s something that may surprise you as much as it did me.

For years I auto-paid my classic car insurance premium and lived with the illusion that if the worst happened, and my car was badly damaged, I would be reimbursed the “fair market value.” Nothing could have been further from the truth.

Since this light bulb moment of insurance deception, I have had this discussion with other classic car owners who were under the same misconception as I. Here’s the way it really works.

In my world, my sixty-two year old Jaguar is valuable for a variety of reasons. First, the simple fact it has survived sixty-two years. Second, it runs, has all its parts, and still looks pretty go. Plus, the laws of supply and demand work in my favor.

Many insurance companies have an opposing view. In their collective minds, my car is worth almost nothing BECAUSE it is 62 years old. What it looks like is irrelevant. The law of depreciation trumps everything in the collector car world. The over riding fact is it is old and therefore worthless due to depreciation.

If I had gotten into a bad accident with my old insurance company, they would have “totaled” the car and paid me the scrap value which would have been almost nothing. For years I never got the memo that told me this. When I found out, I immediately changed insurance companies.

That led me to a whole new approach to insuring old cars, such as “stated value” policies.  I’m humbling myself in the interest of maybe saving one of you from suffering the loss of your car, but possibly, the investment value it has as well.

There are many classic car insurance companies, but beware, they have strict rules, and lots of hoops to jump through before they will insure your treasure. One requirement in particular is to keep your car behind a locking garage door. Only two garages on my whole block even have a garage door.

There are lots more restrictions too, so if you shop around, keep in mind the way you use your car. Going out for a Sunday drive may be a thing of the past. Driving to work…not any more, and a quick trip to the market for milk and eggs…go ahead, but your insurance will be void if something happens.

The list of things you are allowed to do with your car might be a very short one if you obey the policy rules to the letter. So, for what it’s worth, if you survive the first hit, it might be worth reading the small print to make sure your insurance company doesn’t hit you harder the second time.

In the interest of learning more about this topic, I invite members to contact me with stories and experiences they have had, both good and bad. Maybe sharing them with each other will make all of us more knowledgeable on the subject.

Drive careful and have a great weekend.

Aloha, Rob